Most of these factors are already known to us but there are other factors that we perhaps don’t consider when choosing a plant and where to plant it. And these factors are the immediate environment around where you are going to plant your plant and what effects it will have on different types of plants and during different times of the year.

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Zeolite – The Basics

Zeolite is a naturally occurring material found in many countries around the world, as well as Australia in Northern New South Wales.   It is very low in nutrients but contains some Potassium, a small amount of Calcium and is known to have a very high Cation Exchange Capacity (see Did You Know section below).

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Basic Soil Properties

Soil is created from the erosion, weathering and disintegration of rocks such as Granite, Shale, Quartz and Limestone over millions of years.  The base rock is weathered by rain, sunlight, ice, organic acids (from plants decomposing that produce a weak acid called Humic acid), temperature (when the rock has the forces on it of expansion and contraction as the temperature changes), and other factors.

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Diatomaceous Earth is a naturally occurring soft, sedimentary rock that crumbles easily to a fine white to off-white powder depending on other particles that get mixed in with it during excavation. The typical chemical composition is 80-90 % silica, with 2-4 % alumina, and 0.5 -2 % iron oxide, and other trace elements, making it an inert product. It does not get degraded by microbes or sunlight and will continue to be effective as an insecticide as long as it is dry and not wet. It can be easier to spread over a lawn with a spray gun and water solution but will not be effective till it dries out. It can hold up to 200 times its own weight in water; does not emit vapors and does not dissolve in water, though it is easily mixed with food and water and comes in many different shapes and sizes.

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Good and Bad Moss

There are good mosses and bad mosses. The bad moss is one that is dense and covers the top of a potted plant restricting any water from entering, especially if it gets quite dry as it is then rather hard to re-wet.

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Poisonous Plants

Some plants are listed as poisonous (and they are) but only if eaten in large quantities while other plants have toxic parts only if eaten by humans and are therefore listed as poisonous. But the likelihood of someone eating a part of these plants is very slim indeed.Who of us is likely to eat the tuber of a Cyclamen? It is highly poisonous and fortunately tastes acrid and bitter so we are more likely to spit it out than eat it.

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Ethylene on the other hand, (at room temperature) is a colourless, odourless gas that at (roughly) a concentration of 6% with air, is highly explosive. It freezes at -169.4 C and boils at 103.9 C so is normally found to be a gas unless compressed.

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Bacterial Infections

In last months blog we referred to both good and bad fungi and bacteria being present everywhere in the environment, and many of which cause diseases in plants while others help plants, animals and humans.For instance – Penicillin (extracted from the fungi Penicillin)
could be called ‘Good Bacteria’ because it can be used in medicine to treat diseases.

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The clipping from your lawn can be a useful addition to the garden providing another source of nutrients as they decompose.  But…they may also be loaded with herbicides or fertilizers and thus become a bad addition to the garden.

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When you want to prune a plant there are three rules that should be used in this order; 1. Remove any dead, diseased or otherwise damaged parts 2. Remove any branches or limbs that are crossing over each other 3. Prune to the shape that you are aft

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